OTM News

Journeys to Winslow Exhibit Opening

Posted by on Oct 3, 2017 in News | 0 comments

Journeys to Winslow Exhibit Opening

In partnership with the Winslow Chamber of Commerce and the Just Cruis’n Car Club, the Old Trails Museum and Tess and Lawrence Kenna hosted a ribbon-cutting for the Journeys to Winslow exhibit’s permanent installation in the Skylark Courtyard, 116 East Second Street, at 9:30 am on Saturday, October 7, during the Car Club’s Annual Car Show. (Left: The Skylark Courtyard with the World’s Smallest Church on Route 66 in view.) Tess and Lawrence Kenna commissioned Museum Director Ann-Mary Lutzick to revise the original Journeys to Winslow exhibit and to work with Northern Arizona Signs of Flagstaff to reprint the panels to withstand outdoor conditions. The exhibit has been condensed from ten to eight panels, and the text and images have been revised with tourists in mind. The Skylark Courtyard will be a stop along the Journey Through Winslow Pathway, a trail for visitors and residents alike to explore Winslow’s history and current downtown revitalization. Developed by the Kennas, the path’s other stops include the World’s Smallest Church on Route 66 and historic facades and murals throughout the downtown historic district. The Journeys to Winslow exhibit was originally developed by the Old Trails Museum as a companion to the Smithsonian’s Journey Stories exhibition, which explores migration, transportation, and travel in America. Winslow was the grand opening host community for Arizona Humanities’ statewide tour of Journey Stories, which OTM hosted at our partner venue, La Posada Hotel, in summer 2013. This revised version of the Journeys to Winslow exhibit, and the Kenna’s generous sponsorship, make it possible for OTM to reach more people with Winslow’s fascinating history. For the latest updates on all of the Old Trails Museum’s exhibits and programs, subscribe to our “News” feed or “like” the museum on...

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2017 WHS Annual Meeting

Posted by on Sep 29, 2017 in News | 0 comments

2017 WHS Annual Meeting

The Old Trails Museum hosted the 2017 Winslow Historical Society Annual Meeting on Sunday, November 5, from 2 to 4 pm at the Winslow Visitors Center/Hubbell Trading Post, 523 West Second Street. The free event began at 2 pm with refreshments and a concert by Navajo musician Khent Anantakai. Since 2009, Anantakai has entertained nightly at La Posada Hotel, where the building’s history and atmosphere have inspired his original compositions of “contemporary classical” guitar. The WHS Annual Meeting began at 2:45 with a performance of the Star Spangled Banner by twin sisters Bailey and Madison Hartman. The meeting included the election of new Board members and brief reports on museum activities over the past year. While there, attendees joined or renewed their memberships for 2018; bought the Old Trail Museum’s 2018 historical calendar, Getting Together: Recreation and Celebrations in Winslow; and took tickets for a chance to win a terrific door prize donated by the OTM Store, La Posada Hotel, and several Board members. In addition to our current members, the Old Trails Museum extended a special invitation to anyone who might be interested in becoming an OTM Volunteer: “If you or someone you know loves history, please consider joining us at the Annual Meeting and talking with current volunteers about their experiences.” Our current volunteers bring their enthusiasm and professional skills to a variety of duties: hosting visitors, organizing collections and archives, and helping with public programs. So volunteers can have their pick of ways to help, in manageable 2-1/2 hour shifts. OTM Volunteers learn more about our home and its history; they make new friends and deepen existing friendships; they attend the annual Volunteer Thank-you Party; and they meet and talk with visitors from all over the country and the world. They serve as our public face to these visitors, as our ambassadors from the museum, from Winslow, from Arizona, and from Route 66. The Winslow Historical Society’s annual celebration of our membership is a reflection of the Old Trails Museum’s community support and the backbone of our grassroots fundraising efforts. With you, we have a future; without you, we’re...

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2017 High-Desert Fly-In & Gala

Posted by on Aug 18, 2017 in News | 0 comments

2017 High-Desert Fly-In & Gala

The 2017 High-Desert Fly-In took place at the Winslow-Lindbergh Regional Airport, 701 Airport Road, on Saturday, September 16, from 7 am to 12 noon. Admission was free and residents, tourists, and pilots were invited to Winslow’s historic airport to enjoy airplanes, history, food, and more! Once again, the High Desert Fly-In Committee kicked off this year’s event with the Fly Back in Time Gala in the airport’s historic hangar on Friday, September 15, the evening before the Fly-In. Gala tickets were available for $25 at the Winslow Visitors Center or from a link on the High Desert Fly-In Website. Guests entered the hangar — beautifully decorated by the Winslow Public Library – and were greeted and given door-prize tickets by members of the Helldorado Girls, a nonprofit women’s group. Gala attendees were invited to travel back in time by dressing in period attire and trying for a prize in the Vintage Threads Contest. Awards were given to an individual, a couple, and a group. Guests also listened and danced to the nostalgic sounds of the Big Band Connection from Flagstaff. Since the early 1990s, some of Northern Arizona’s most outstanding musicians have entertained audiences with swing and jazz classics made famous by band leaders such as Count Basie, Tommy Dorsey, Duke Ellington, Harry James, and Glenn Miller. A catered buffet dinner was served at 7 pm, and the band performed until 9 pm. Guests helped themselves to free retro candy at the Candy Terminal provided by the Winslow Chamber of Commerce. The City of Winslow provided free photos by Deborah Allen Photography that became available online after the gala. Guests also bid in the High Desert Silent Auction on items donated by local businesses and individuals. The Auction closed the next morning at 11 am, during the Fly-In. The next morning, attendees took a shuttle from the free parking along Airport Road to the free High Desert Fly-In. The Winslow Rotary Club hosted a pancake breakfast from 7 to 9 am for $6 per person. High Desert Fly-In polo shirts were also be on sale. Attendees were allowed on the tarmac to view the visiting aircraft, which included general aviation planes and medical transport aircraft owned by Guardian Air and Aerocare. The Just Cruis’n Car Club host a Mini Show-and-Shine of vintage automobiles, including the 1940 Seagraves fire truck owned by the Winslow Historical Society. The airport also offered First Flights, complimentary plane rides that introduced 41 youngsters to aviation. There was also a 9 am ribbon-cutting ceremony for new Runway 4-22. Inside the historic hangar, the Flying Fun Kids Area included several hands-on activities provided by the Winslow Public Library, a telescope from the Winslow-Homolovi Observatory, and an interactive World Travel Map where kids of all ages pinned their favorite travel destinations. The High Desert Silent Auction continued from 7 to 11 am, when the bidding closed and bidders collected their items. The Flying Through History Area included the Old Trails Museum’s Flying through History: The Winslow-Lindbergh Regional Airport exhibit and The Swamp Ghost and World War II exhibit. Historian Erik Berg talked with attendees about his artifacts and writings on aviation in the Southwest; former Civil Air Patrol instructor Dale Mansfield talked about his display of World War I aircraft models; and Steve Owens from the Grants...

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2017 Fall History Highlight: Winslow and the TAT

Posted by on Aug 4, 2017 in News | 0 comments

2017 Fall History Highlight: Winslow and the TAT

In conjunction with the 2017 Fly Back in Time Gala and High Desert Fly-In on September 15 and 16, the Old Trails Museum offered its 2017 Fall History Highlight on Thursday, September 14, at 7 pm at the Winslow Visitors Center/Hubbell Trading Post, 523 West Second Street. Historian Erik Berg gave a free presentation of Coast to Coast in 48 Hours!: Winslow and America’s First Transcontinental Airline Service. Berg’s presentation examined Winslow’s pioneering role in Southwest aviation using original research and featuring rarely-seen historic photographs and movie clips. In 1928, famous aviators Charles Lindbergh and Amelia Earhart joined businessmen Clement Keys and Paul Henderson to revolutionize America’s air passenger service with an ambitious new firm called the Transcontinental Air Transport (TAT) Company. Known as the “Lindbergh Line” and promising the nation’s first cross-country passenger service from New York to Los Angeles, TAT laid the foundation for many aspects of modern air travel and would later evolve into Trans World Airlines (TWA). As a key stop on TAT’s cross-country route, Winslow was the site of one of the Southwest’s most advanced early airports and hosted a steady stream of wealthy and famous passengers. Over the course of the following year, Winslow’s airport played a part in many important TAT-related events: the development of one of the world’s most famous aircraft; the tragic wreck of the City of San Francisco on Mount Taylor; the pioneering use of aircraft for archaeology; and the little-known flying monkey publicity stunt. Today, the Winslow-Lindbergh Regional Airport is the best preserved of the original TAT airfields and an important landmark in aviation history. Erik Berg is an award-winning writer and historian with a special interest in science and technology in the early twentieth century Southwest. His work has been featured in Astronomy, Arizona Highways, Journal of Arizona History, Journal of the Society of Commercial Archaeology, Sedona Magazine, and the book Arizona Goes to War: The Home Front and the Front Lines during World War II.  Raised in Flagstaff and based in Phoenix, Berg is a graduate of the University of Arizona and a past president of the Grand Canyon Historical Society. He has been exploring, hiking, and researching the Southwest for over thirty years. For the latest updates on all of the Old Trails Museum’s exhibits and programs, subscribe to our “News” feed or “like” the museum on...

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2017 Summer History Highlight: Native Roads

Posted by on Apr 27, 2017 in News | 0 comments

2017 Summer History Highlight: Native Roads

The Old Trails Museum presented its 2017 Summer History Highlight on Sunday, July 9, at La Posada Hotel. Author and historian Jim Turner gave a free presentation of Native Roads: A Pictorial Guide to the Hopi and Navajo Nations. Turner’s presentation was a virtual road trip that highlighted the beauty, history, and folklore of the Four Corners region. Images include natural wonders like Sunset Crater, Monument Valley, Horseshoe Bend, and Canyon de Chelly; archeological sites such as Wupatki and Aztec Ruins; and trading posts at Teec Nos Pos, Shiprock, Farmington, Gallup, and Keams Canyon. Turner edited the third edition of Native Roads: A Complete Motoring Guide to the Navajo and Hopi Nations, a popular travel guide written by Fran Kosik and first published in 1995. After she graduated from nursing school, Kosik went to work for the Indian Health Service at Tuba City and spent more than three decades learning about the geology, geography, archaeology, history, and culture of the area. But things have changed since the first edition, so Rio Nuevo Publishers asked Turner to retrace Kosik’s routes and update the information. He shared fascinating images, maps, and stories from his trips to the Four Corners, presenting the best of both the original and new material. After hearing Turner’s experiences and insights, newcomers to the area were inspired to visit these Native roads, and longtime residents relived fond memories and decide to return. Turner worked with museums across the state before retiring from the Arizona Historical Society. He authored the pictorial history, Arizona: Celebration of the Grand Canyon State and co-authored the 4th-grade textbook, The Arizona Story. Turner earned a MA in US history from the University of Arizona and has been researching and teaching Arizona history for more than forty years. The 2017 Summer History Highlight, a partnership program between the Old Trails Museum and La Posada Hotel, was made possible in part by Arizona Humanities, a non-profit organization and the Arizona affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities. Arizona Humanities strives to help Arizonans better understand themselves and the world around them through grants to organizations and public programs that explore the human experience. For the latest updates on all of the Old Trails Museum’s exhibits and programs, subscribe to our “News” feed or “like” the museum on...

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2017 Winslow Antiques Appraisal Fair

Posted by on Mar 9, 2017 in News | 0 comments

2017 Winslow Antiques Appraisal Fair

Hosted by the Old Trails Museum, the 2017 Winslow Antiques Appraisal Fair took place on Saturday, May 6, from 10 am to 4 pm at Snowdrift Art Space, 120 West Second Street. Sean Morton of Morton Appraisals in Scottsdale brought his expertise back to Winslow so that residents had the opportunity to have their historic items identified and appraised. Mr. Morton offered verbal appraisals (not in writing) of objects including, but not limited to, fine art paintings, prints, sculpture, porcelain, crystal, silver, clocks, antique jewelry, Asian art, and Native American arts and crafts. (No guns, coins, or stamps were appraised.) Attendees scheduled their one-on-one appointment with Mr. Morton, and attendance was limited to forty people. Each person was limited to two items for appraisal. The charge for the first item was $15 and for the second item was $5 (an excellent value versus the cost of a private appraisal). Mr. Morton is a certified, licensed, and insured appraiser, as well as a member of the Antique Appraisal Association of America. He provides fair market and insurance appraisals for estates and individuals. He also works as an independent national auction representative, helping clients consign to nationally-recognized auction houses. Morton regularly appears on Channel Eight’s Arizona Collectables, which airs on Thursday nights at 7:30 pm. The Winslow Antiques Appraisal Fair was presented as a service to the community; the event was not a fundraiser and the charge was only to cover our costs. For the latest updates on all of the Old Trails Museum’s exhibits and programs, subscribe to our “News” feed or “like” the museum on...

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2017 Spring History Highlight: A Mary Colter Play

Posted by on Mar 9, 2017 in News | 0 comments

2017 Spring History Highlight: A Mary Colter Play

In partnership with La Posada Hotel, the Old Trails Museum presented its Spring History Highlight on Saturday, April 8, and Sunday, April 9, 2017. Edgeware Productions presented a revival of A Woman by Design, a play about architect Mary Elizabeth Jane Colter, in La Posada’s Ballroom. Colter was chief architect and designer for the Fred Harvey Company from 1902 through 1949, and her work includes La Posada and most of the buildings along the Grand Canyon’s South Rim. After several months in Arizona studying Colter’s work, actress Elizabeth Ware (above, as Colter) and producer David Edgecombe created this one-act play and premiered it at La Posada Hotel in 2014. Wrote hotel owner Allan Affeldt at the time: “I have read a great deal about Ms. Colter (and) your play was both poignant and insightful.” A Woman by Design is a fascinating character study of a strong-willed woman who was pivotal in the development of Southwestern architectural design despite working in a male-dominated field. Ware portrays Colter at three crucial life stages: an uncertain young art student, a self-taught architect at the peak of her powers, and an 88-year-old woman facing the sale or demolition of some of her beloved projects. The play explores the Southwestern landscape that inspired Colter and the artistic passion that drove her, “not to overpower nature, but to become a kind of interpreter.” The production features slides of Colter’s major works and a brief talk after the performance. In addition to acting in dozens of productions, Ware holds a Master’s in acting from Kent State University and served as Adjunct Faculty at the University of Alaska Anchorage (UAA) in the Departments of Communication, Theatre and Dance. Dr. Edgecombe earned his Ph.D. at Kent State and is an author, playwright, and retired Professor of Theatre at UAA. Ware and Edgecombe founded Edgeware Productions in 1990 and have produced award-winning plays and educational performances throughout their home state of Alaska, the United States, and Europe. The 2017 Spring History Highlight was a partnership program between the Old Trails Museum and La Posada Hotel. For the latest updates on all of the Old Trails Museum’s exhibits and programs, subscribe to our “News” feed or “like” the museum on...

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2017 Winter History Highlight: Fireside Stories

Posted by on Jan 27, 2017 in News | 0 comments

2017 Winter History Highlight: Fireside Stories

The Old Trails Museum presented its 2017 Winter History Highlight at 3 pm on February 12 at La Posada Hotel. Author Lisa Schnebly Heidinger’s gave a free presentation of Fireside Stories: Who Did You Say Was Here? by the fire in La Posada’s Ballroom. While researching Arizona’s official centennial book, Arizona: 100 Years Grand, Heidinger developed a treasure trove of anecdotes about famous figures and lesser-known characters from the tapestry that is Arizona. Her fireside presentation included memorable stories that brought Northern Arizona to life, on topics ranging from Navajo Code Talkers and Hopi artist Fred Kabotie to Percival Lowell’s legacy and Clark Gable’s adventure in the region. She told tales of the drugstore manager on Winslow’s famous corner who always wore a hat; Buckey O’Neill’s statue barely arriving at its own dedication in Prescott; and John D. Lee’s wife, Emma “Doctor Grandma” French, who gave birth twice by herself while her husband was hiding from the law. An Arizona native, Heidinger’s deepest passion is discovering little-known stories about her home state and sharing them with a wide audience. She became interested in Arizona pioneer history as a small child, when she learned that the town of Sedona had been named after her great-grandmother, Sedona Schnebly. She began her professional career in Tucson as a broadcast journalist and a writer for several magazines. She continued television work in Flagstaff before settling in Phoenix, where she now focuses on publishing books and articles. Voted OneBookAZ in 2012, Arizona: 100 Years Grand is a geographical, historical, and cultural collection of our state’s best and brightest people, places, and events during the first century of statehood. Her other titles include Sedona’s Images of America title; the children’s book The Three Sedonas; Tucson: The Old Pueblo; Calling Arizona Home, co-authored with Fred DuVal; and Chief Yellowhorse Lives On, a collection of essays. She has also developed a curriculum that she takes to schools around the state that helps children learn how to write. The 2017 Winter History Highlight, a partnership program between the Old Trails Museum and La Posada Hotel, was made possible in part by Arizona Humanities, a non-profit organization and the Arizona affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities. Arizona Humanities strives to help Arizonans better understand themselves and the world around them through grants to organizations and public programs that explore the human experience. For the latest updates on all of the Old Trails Museum’s exhibits and programs, subscribe to our “News” feed or “like” the museum on...

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2016 WHS Annual Meeting

Posted by on Oct 19, 2016 in News | 0 comments

2016 WHS Annual Meeting

The Winslow Historical Society hosted its 2016 Annual Meeting on November 6 at the Winslow Visitors Center/Hubbell Trading Post. The free event began at 2 pm with a reception and performance by the Better-Than-Nothings, when Greg and Casey performed an acoustic mix of pop, rock, country, and blues classics. The WHS Annual Meeting began at about 2:45 and included the election of new board members and brief reports on museum activities over the past year. While there, attendees joined or renewed their memberships for 2017; bought the museum’s 2017 historical calendar, America’s Main Street: US Route 66 in Winslow; and took tickets for a chance to win a terrific door prize donated by the Old Trails Museum Store, La Posada Hotel, and several current board members. Please join us next year for the Winslow Historical Society’s annual celebration of our membership, which is a reflection of the Old Trails Museum’s community support and the backbone of our grassroots fundraising efforts. With you, we have a future; without you, we’re...

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2016 Fall History Highlight: Arizona’s Women Quilters

Posted by on Aug 30, 2016 in News | 0 comments

2016 Fall History Highlight: Arizona’s Women Quilters

In conjunction with the 2016 Material Girls Quilt Guild Show, the Old Trails Museum offered its 2016 Fall History Highlight on Thursday, September 29, at 5 pm, at the Winslow Visitors Center/Hubbell Trading Post, 523 West Second Street. Author and filmmaker Pam Knight Stevenson gave a free presentation of Written in Thread: Arizona Women’s History Preserved in Their Quilts, which traces the history of Arizona through women who recorded pieces of their lives in their needlework. (Left: Arizona State Seal quilt made by Emma Andres of Prescott in the 1930s, courtesy of Pam Knight Stevenson.) From Mexican women of the 1860s through Hopi women of the 1990s, Stevenson introduced some of the women who pioneered Arizona through the quilts they stitched, including Emma Andres and Mary Smith Lawler of Prescott, Sedona Schnebly and Ruth Woolf Jordan of Sedona, Alice Gillette Haught of Payson, and several Hopi quilters currently active in northeastern Arizona. These women quilted colorful patterns to add a spot of brightness to their homes and their lives, as well as to record and celebrate special events. Stevenson also showed how quiltmakers continue to commemorate personal and community events, and she will invite the audience to recall any special family quilts. Written in Thread also featured quilts discovered by the Arizona Quilt Project, which documents the history of quilts made in Arizona before 1940. The results of this five-year quilt search were recorded in two women’s history projects: the book Grand Endeavors: Vintage Arizona Quilts and their Makers, co-authored by Stevenson; and the television documentary Arizona Quilts: Pieces of Time, written and produced by Stevenson and funded by Arizona Humanities and SRP. A native of Los Angeles, Pam Knight Stevenson earned a history degree from UCLA and moved to Arizona in 1972. She served as Managing Editor of the Phoenix CBS news department and as Manager of Production for the Phoenix PBS station. Stevenson has been researching and writing about Arizona history for more than thirty years and has conducted hundreds of oral history interviews with Arizona Historymakers, Navajo Code Talkers, Harvey Girls, journalists, and, of course, quilters. Focusing on women’s history, she also co-authored the book Skirting Traditions: Arizona Women Writers & Journalists 1912–2012, and wrote and produced the documentary Hopi Quilts, which aired on PBS nationally for three years. The 2016 Material Girls Quilt Guild Show was on display at Snowdrift Art Space from 10 am to 6 pm on Friday and Saturday, September 23 and 24, and again on Friday and Saturday, September 30 and October 1. The 2016 Fall History Highlight, a partnership program between the Old Trails Museum and the Winslow Chamber of Commerce, was made possible in part by Arizona Humanities. For the latest updates on all of the Old Trails Museum’s exhibits and programs, subscribe to our “News” feed or “like” the museum on...

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