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2017 Fall History Highlight: Winslow and the TAT

Posted by on Aug 4, 2017 in News | 0 comments

2017 Fall History Highlight: Winslow and the TAT

In conjunction with the 2017 Fly Back in Time Gala and High Desert Fly-In on September 15 and 16, the Old Trails Museum offers its 2017 Fall History Highlight on Thursday, September 14, at 7 pm at the Winslow Visitors Center/Hubbell Trading Post, 523 West Second Street. Historian Erik Berg will give a free presentation of Coast to Coast in 48 Hours!: Winslow and America’s First Transcontinental Airline Service. Berg’s presentation will examine Winslow’s pioneering role in Southwest aviation using original research and featuring rarely-seen historic photographs and movie clips. In 1928, famous aviators Charles Lindbergh and Amelia Earhart joined businessmen Clement Keys and Paul Henderson to revolutionize America’s air passenger service with an ambitious new firm called the Transcontinental Air Transport (TAT) Company. Known as the “Lindbergh Line” and promising the nation’s first cross-country passenger service from New York to Los Angeles, TAT laid the foundation for many aspects of modern air travel and would later evolve into Trans World Airlines (TWA). As a key stop on TAT’s cross-country route, Winslow was the site of one of the Southwest’s most advanced early airports and hosted a steady stream of wealthy and famous passengers. Over the course of the following year, Winslow’s airport played a part in many important TAT-related events: the development of one of the world’s most famous aircraft; the tragic wreck of the City of San Francisco on Mount Taylor; the pioneering use of aircraft for archaeology; and the little-known flying monkey publicity stunt. Today, the Winslow-Lindbergh Regional Airport is the best preserved of the original TAT airfields and an important landmark in aviation history. Erik Berg is an award-winning writer and historian with a special interest in science and technology in the early twentieth century Southwest. His work has been featured in Astronomy, Arizona Highways, Journal of Arizona History, Journal of the Society of Commercial Archaeology, Sedona Magazine, and the book Arizona Goes to War: The Home Front and the Front Lines during World War II.  Raised in Flagstaff and based in Phoenix, Berg is a graduate of the University of Arizona and a past president of the Grand Canyon Historical Society. He has been exploring, hiking, and researching the Southwest for over thirty years. For the latest updates on all of the Old Trails Museum’s exhibits and programs, subscribe to our “News” feed or “like” the museum on...

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2017 Summer History Highlight: Native Roads

Posted by on Apr 27, 2017 in News | 0 comments

2017 Summer History Highlight: Native Roads

The Old Trails Museum presents its 2017 Summer History Highlight on Sunday, July 9, at La Posada Hotel, 303 East Second Street. Join us in La Posada’s Ballroom at 3 pm for author and historian Jim Turner’s free presentation of Native Roads: A Pictorial Guide to the Hopi and Navajo Nations. Turner’s presentation is a virtual road trip that highlights the beauty, history, and folklore of the Four Corners region. Images include natural wonders like Sunset Crater, Monument Valley, Horseshoe Bend, and Canyon de Chelly; archeological sites such as Wupatki and Aztec Ruins; and trading posts at Teec Nos Pos, Shiprock, Farmington, Gallup, and Keams Canyon. Turner edited the third edition of Native Roads: A Complete Motoring Guide to the Navajo and Hopi Nations, a popular travel guide written by Fran Kosik and first published in 1995. After she graduated from nursing school, Kosik went to work for the Indian Health Service at Tuba City and spent more than three decades learning about the geology, geography, archaeology, history, and culture of the area. But things have changed since the first edition, so Rio Nuevo Publishers asked Turner to retrace Kosik’s routes and update the information. He will share fascinating images, maps, and stories from his trips to the Four Corners, presenting the best of both the original and new material. After hearing Turner’s experiences and insights, newcomers to the area may be inspired to visit these Native roads, and longtime residents may relive fond memories and decide to return. Turner worked with museums across the state before retiring from the Arizona Historical Society. He authored the pictorial history, Arizona: Celebration of the Grand Canyon State and co-authored the 4th-grade textbook, The Arizona Story. Turner earned a MA in US history from the University of Arizona and has been researching and teaching Arizona history for more than forty years. The 2017 Summer History Highlight, a partnership program between the Old Trails Museum and La Posada Hotel, was made possible in part by Arizona Humanities, a non-profit organization and the Arizona affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities. Arizona Humanities strives to help Arizonans better understand themselves and the world around them through grants to organizations and public programs that explore the human experience. For the latest updates on all of the Old Trails Museum’s exhibits and programs, subscribe to our “News” feed or “like” the museum on...

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2017 Winslow Antiques Appraisal Fair

Posted by on Mar 9, 2017 in News | 0 comments

2017 Winslow Antiques Appraisal Fair

If you’re ever wondered about that old family heirloom, bring it to the 2017 Winslow Antiques Appraisal Fair! Hosted by the Old Trails Museum, the fair will take place on Saturday, May 6, from 10 am to 4 pm at Snowdrift Art Space, 120 West Second Street. Sean Morton of Morton Appraisals in Scottsdale is bringing his expertise back to Winslow so that residents will have the opportunity to have their historic items identified and appraised. Mr. Morton will offer verbal appraisals (not in writing) of objects including, but not limited to, fine art paintings, prints, sculpture, porcelain, crystal, silver, clocks, antique jewelry, Asian art, and Native American arts and crafts. (No guns, coins, or stamps will be appraised.) To schedule your one-on-one appointment with Mr. Morton, call the Old Trails Museum at 928-289-5861 by Thursday, May 4. Attendance is limited to forty people, and each person is limited to two items for appraisal. The charge for the first item is $15 and for the second item is $5 (an excellent value versus the cost of a private appraisal). Mr. Morton is a certified, licensed, and insured appraiser, as well as a member of the Antique Appraisal Association of America. He provides fair market and insurance appraisals for estates and individuals. He also works as an independent national auction representative, helping clients consign to nationally-recognized auction houses. Morton regularly appears on Channel Eight’s Arizona Collectables, which airs on Thursday nights at 7:30 pm. The Winslow Antiques Appraisal Fair is presented as a service to the community; the event is not a fundraiser and the charge is only to cover our costs. For the latest updates on all of the Old Trails Museum’s exhibits and programs, subscribe to our “News” feed or “like” the museum on...

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2017 Spring History Highlight: A Mary Colter Play

Posted by on Mar 9, 2017 in News | 0 comments

2017 Spring History Highlight: A Mary Colter Play

In partnership with La Posada Hotel, the Old Trails Museum presented its Spring History Highlight on Saturday, April 8, and Sunday, April 9, 2017. Edgeware Productions presented a revival of A Woman by Design, a play about architect Mary Elizabeth Jane Colter, in La Posada’s Ballroom. Colter was chief architect and designer for the Fred Harvey Company from 1902 through 1949, and her work includes La Posada and most of the buildings along the Grand Canyon’s South Rim. After several months in Arizona studying Colter’s work, actress Elizabeth Ware (above, as Colter) and producer David Edgecombe created this one-act play and premiered it at La Posada Hotel in 2014. Wrote hotel owner Allan Affeldt at the time: “I have read a great deal about Ms. Colter (and) your play was both poignant and insightful.” A Woman by Design is a fascinating character study of a strong-willed woman who was pivotal in the development of Southwestern architectural design despite working in a male-dominated field. Ware portrays Colter at three crucial life stages: an uncertain young art student, a self-taught architect at the peak of her powers, and an 88-year-old woman facing the sale or demolition of some of her beloved projects. The play explores the Southwestern landscape that inspired Colter and the artistic passion that drove her, “not to overpower nature, but to become a kind of interpreter.” The production features slides of Colter’s major works and a brief talk after the performance. In addition to acting in dozens of productions, Ware holds a Master’s in acting from Kent State University and served as Adjunct Faculty at the University of Alaska Anchorage (UAA) in the Departments of Communication, Theatre and Dance. Dr. Edgecombe earned his Ph.D. at Kent State and is an author, playwright, and retired Professor of Theatre at UAA. Ware and Edgecombe founded Edgeware Productions in 1990 and have produced award-winning plays and educational performances throughout their home state of Alaska, the United States, and Europe. The 2017 Spring History Highlight was a partnership program between the Old Trails Museum and La Posada Hotel. For the latest updates on all of the Old Trails Museum’s exhibits and programs, subscribe to our “News” feed or “like” the museum on...

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2017 Winter History Highlight: Fireside Stories

Posted by on Jan 27, 2017 in News | 0 comments

2017 Winter History Highlight: Fireside Stories

The Old Trails Museum presented its 2017 Winter History Highlight at 3 pm on February 12 at La Posada Hotel. Author Lisa Schnebly Heidinger’s gave a free presentation of Fireside Stories: Who Did You Say Was Here? by the fire in La Posada’s Ballroom. While researching Arizona’s official centennial book, Arizona: 100 Years Grand, Heidinger developed a treasure trove of anecdotes about famous figures and lesser-known characters from the tapestry that is Arizona. Her fireside presentation included memorable stories that brought Northern Arizona to life, on topics ranging from Navajo Code Talkers and Hopi artist Fred Kabotie to Percival Lowell’s legacy and Clark Gable’s adventure in the region. She told tales of the drugstore manager on Winslow’s famous corner who always wore a hat; Buckey O’Neill’s statue barely arriving at its own dedication in Prescott; and John D. Lee’s wife, Emma “Doctor Grandma” French, who gave birth twice by herself while her husband was hiding from the law. An Arizona native, Heidinger’s deepest passion is discovering little-known stories about her home state and sharing them with a wide audience. She became interested in Arizona pioneer history as a small child, when she learned that the town of Sedona had been named after her great-grandmother, Sedona Schnebly. She began her professional career in Tucson as a broadcast journalist and a writer for several magazines. She continued television work in Flagstaff before settling in Phoenix, where she now focuses on publishing books and articles. Voted OneBookAZ in 2012, Arizona: 100 Years Grand is a geographical, historical, and cultural collection of our state’s best and brightest people, places, and events during the first century of statehood. Her other titles include Sedona’s Images of America title; the children’s book The Three Sedonas; Tucson: The Old Pueblo; Calling Arizona Home, co-authored with Fred DuVal; and Chief Yellowhorse Lives On, a collection of essays. She has also developed a curriculum that she takes to schools around the state that helps children learn how to write. The 2017 Winter History Highlight, a partnership program between the Old Trails Museum and La Posada Hotel, was made possible in part by Arizona Humanities, a non-profit organization and the Arizona affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities. Arizona Humanities strives to help Arizonans better understand themselves and the world around them through grants to organizations and public programs that explore the human experience. For the latest updates on all of the Old Trails Museum’s exhibits and programs, subscribe to our “News” feed or “like” the museum on...

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